Blog: June 2013

The point at which RCD Compliance becomes a legal requirement

Confusion within the Marine industry means that some may believe RCD compliance for an imported recreational craft is only required when the craft is sold on.  Here, with reference to definitions and text within the Directive, we show this is not the case and that if it's reasonable to conclude the craft is 'in use', it must also at this point be RCD compliant.

The Recreational Craft Directive uses two key phrases when talking about the point at which compliance becomes a requirement.  These are:

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Pitfalls of buying boats privately in Europe

What drives sellers to list boats privately?  Is it just saving commission, or is it more a question of whether the boat can be legally sold.  We discuss why you should be careful when buying privately....

Most European brokers insist on three key ‘proofs’ when listing a recreation craft:

  • Proof of ownership
  • Proof of VAT paid status
  • Proof of RCD Compliance (CE Marking)

Sellers without these ‘proofs’ often look to other online sales portals where a private advert can be placed, no questions asked.  Of these, the most common are:

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Are you invalidating your Pleasure Craft insurance?

A large number of imported craft have come to Europe after 1998, when the Recreational Craft Directive (RCD) was first introduced.  Many of those arriving before 2006 are still either not compliant or poorly certified.  If your boat is non-compliant it is illegal to use and this may impact both your insurance cover and personal liability in the event of a claim..

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